Good books for kids?...

Cartter

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Sep 10, 2012
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looks good book for children as it will help especially the childrens from the age of 4-8 years in grooming up their knowledge and making them mature very soon
 

CeenRodriguez

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Jan 15, 2013
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Picture books are good for a start, but if you wanted to make them learn good lessons, you can start making them appreciate the classics. Black Beauty is the first book to make me cry when I was a kid, and it really instilled lessons that I live up to now.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer- Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain
Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens

39 Clues - Rick Riordan is cool too. I borrowed one from by niece so I knew :D...
 

edgar

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Jan 22, 2013
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nwcrazy said:
First, I'd like to say that kids who learn to read early are (more than likely) NOT smarter than other kids. Involved parents are the difference.

With that said, may I suggest you get ANY or ALL of the Eric Carle books. They're fantastic. The first book my daughter ever read was an Eric Carle book.
My wife who has been 10 years as a pre school teacher totally agrees & she highly recommends this since she used this and is still using it with her students and had a great experience with it. She particularly mentioned about 'A very hungry caterpillar'.:)
 

Flowers

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Mar 21, 2013
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jollysmith123 said:
I find it very important that kids get into the habit of reading. Could anyone suggest some good books that they can start of with. Books that are simple, with good language, and interesting too.
I just wanted to let you know about a free Kindle book that's getting great reviews. It's called "The Alphabet Book of Animals - Easy Ways to Learn The ABCs" by Chris Q Sheridan.
It's got great photos of animals for each of the letters of the alphabet. It will be free on Kindle through Wednesday April 10th, so you'll definitely want to go and download it while it's free! Here's the Amazon direct link: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BM672WA
Let me know if you think it's as great as I do :)
 

mumOF3boys

Junior Member
Apr 30, 2013
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hi there. Reading to kids at all ages is so valuable. Yes knowing their interests in vital, so that the child wants to read book. My sons' really liked the 'choose your own adventure' books that I loaned from my local library. But what I found was that when my boys actually knew the words in the book and that they themselves were the ones reading the words, that they not only wanted me to read them a story but they wanted to read ME a story as well. My boys also really liked the Dr Suess books and Mr Men/Little Miss books.

Another thing I used to do when reading with my children is to just "walk through" the book and talk about the pictures and discuss whats happening or predict what might happen next.

Perhaps you could also start introducing your child/ren to word flash cards. If you research 'Dolch Words' or 'high frequency words' on google, it should bring up some options for you to check out. Doing this would build their confidence for when they start learning common words at school which in turn helps their reading. I also found a site that sells mobile device apps/games that contains school sight words which are aimed at improving kids reading & confidence. If you put http://sightwordapp.com into google, that should come up as well.

Sorry for rambling, I hope this helps in some way :)
 
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kidsisland

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Mar 11, 2015
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You can choose book with colorful pictures and with little big letters and dialog method story books will attract the child to read the book.Just try and see.
 

jtmeserole

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Mar 31, 2015
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My 9yo got his start reading chapter books by himself with the Magic Tree House series. My older boys loved the Deltora Quest series when they were younger. My girls loved the Magic Attic Club books. Narnia books are great for reading to the kids. My husband read Where the Red Fern Grows to our kids when they were younger, and they loved it!
You are embarking on a great adventure! It is so fun to share stories with our children. :)
 

dangerouslydead

Junior Member
Sep 1, 2008
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My daughter who is 8 years now, reads a lot of books that are imaginative and gripping. She is hung up on books like Judy Moody, Goosebumps, Choose your own adventure. What I do is supplement these with books like encyclopaedia, biographies and general books on ancient history.

Being from a book publishing background I have kept a pretty healthy library for her since her birth. Right from Alphabet books and Picture books as a toddler to comic books, abridged classics (Jules Verne being one of her favourites), I've spent a fortune buying these books. My only lament is that that we do not have community libraries anymore. Growing up, we had access to great libraries in our neighbourhood.

My suggestion would be to balance the kind of books you procure for them. Keep a healthy mix of facts, fiction, adventure and fun. They need to check out everything before making their choice.
 

artmom

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Feb 26, 2015
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dangerouslydead said:
My daughter who is 8 years now, reads a lot of books that are imaginative and gripping. She is hung up on books like Judy Moody, Goosebumps, Choose your own adventure. What I do is supplement these with books like encyclopaedia, biographies and general books on ancient history.

Being from a book publishing background I have kept a pretty healthy library for her since her birth. Right from Alphabet books and Picture books as a toddler to comic books, abridged classics (Jules Verne being one of her favourites), I've spent a fortune buying these books. My only lament is that that we do not have community libraries anymore. Growing up, we had access to great libraries in our neighbourhood.

My suggestion would be to balance the kind of books you procure for them. Keep a healthy mix of facts, fiction, adventure and fun. They need to check out everything before making their choice.
Same here. Me and her dad still had a bunch of books from our childhood and I started reading to her from the moment she came home from the hospital. She may not have understood a thing but it's a good way to introduce books as a normal daily routine and she loved just hearing her mom and dad's voice. By the time she was 6 months old, she was more active but was really loving her books and looking at the pictures. You could start telling she had her favourite stories, which indicated to us she was starting to understand more words than she was able to say. We piled up on different books. We bought one or 2 books every month for years. I enjoyed that. Reading the same book all the time was a bit gag inducing. I bought books on space, geography, science, animals, safety at home and in the community, children's issues (She still likes this one about bullying), being helpful, fantasy (She loved Cosgrove books, her favourite was Catundra). She started reading novels when she was in grade 2. Now she is expanding her Warriors and Goosebumps collection very quickly and is now into manga, particularly The Black Butler and can finish a novel or 2 in a day. At first I didn't believe she was actually reading the whole story until she gave me summaries of the book in detail and knows the personalities and backstory of every one of the vast characters. She has a mature taste in books and takes to the novels she has to read in class and has been asking me to get those novels for herself so she can read them again. She's been writing songs and her own stories, well, stories inspired by her favourite novels. Originality was never a very strong attribute to anyone in the family, despite our artistic skills.
 

kitty

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Apr 28, 2015
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At Kindergarten age, I taught science and social studies with library books, using World Book Encyclopedia's Typical Course of Study. We just checked out books on the things listed and enjoyed them together. Occasionally, I would find a coloring page online about the topic and my kids would color those. The idea in kindergarten is to "introduce" topics . . . not to master them.

Hope this helps.
 
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CraigK

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Aug 10, 2015
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San Diego
4-8 is a wide range! Reading greatly improves in that time span. My kids are 7-15 so I'm a little past the prime in terms of making recommendations but i know that my oldest daughter loved reading Judy Bloom books-- try that!
 

m3zomo

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Oct 31, 2015
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I suggest that you check this program that helped a lot of parents for children learning reading
http://parentsskills.com/children-learning-reading-review/[/URL]
 

patsgonecrazy

Junior Member
Nov 6, 2015
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new brunswick, conneticut
I really like the 'I'm going to read' series! The books are pretty cheap and the kiddos really like them!

<AMAZON id="1402725086" url="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1402725086/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1402725086&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=dominionmagon-20&amp;linkId=5TC2DQRGWJINAAKT">http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1402725086/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1402725086&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=dominionmagon-20&amp;linkId=5TC2DQRGWJINAAKT</AMAZON>
 

notashah

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Dec 16, 2015
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Hi,
I'm actually working on publishing a children's book series addressing exactly this.
Here is the link to my kickstarter campaign.
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/436863041/publishing-a-childrens-book-series-about-giving-an[/url]
Please check it out and participate if it is something you believe in! :)
And, if you have any questions, I'd be happy to share my vision.
 

Marlene

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Feb 12, 2016
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RC
There are actually nice books that start kids on values and manners at a young age. I really think I need to start 'em young so I looked online with highest reviews and purchased a couple of nice books. For my sons, I also got nice books about being a good sport and a funny one about not being a caveman which deals on manners. Ofcourse I have the classic Little Prince.
 

artmom

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Feb 26, 2015
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A favorite of mine is 'Bully Troubles'. 2 boys keep encountering the neighbourhood bully and are just sick of his shenanigans. The 2 like to go to the local shop and share a pop. One day, the bully comes along and steals their pop from their hands. The next day they bought 2 cans of pop and when they were finished they thought up an idea to get back. They poured a mix of prune juice, steak sauce and vinegar in one of the empty cans and then they made 2 sandwiches: one pb&amp;j for themselves and one with very hot chili sauce for the bully to steal. LOL
 

Charlotte

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Jun 1, 2016
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Some works I find that the very young benefit a great deal more learning about music in general rather than specifically learning it only through the piano. Some youngsters do not even have a concept of what beat, rhythm, pitch, phrasing etc is, so it would be foolish to try to get them to play a musical instrument without strenghening these very basic foundations.

I have found teaching concepts in "Upbeat, Musical Education in the Classroom" published by Ashton Scholastic is excellent in teaching music to young children and has a lot of activities to teach the students without having to get them to play the piano.

It may be helpful even for these young children to learn on simpler instruments next to learning the piano. The descant Recorder or Xylophone I have found are invaluable instruments to teach young minds with. Also sticks to tap beats and rhythm with are good to accompany with
 
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Helina

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Aug 25, 2016
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Canada
There are plenty of books that are good for kids. Depends on what age we are talking about. However, for teens I would recommend chicken soup for souls. That's one good book. They have for different categories and I just love reading the "for teenagers and for mother's" a lot