How Much Screen Time for Kids?...

Leila

Junior Member
Aug 22, 2011
14
0
0
I understand your worries but I'm suprised how you've managed to cut down on your children's TV time. Half an hour a week is too little when you live in a digital world and refusing technology is like refusing life
 

Christopher

PF Regular
Jul 27, 2011
44
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0
71
New Jersey
An interesting comment Leila. Although I am no Luddite (I love my gadgets) I am not sure I agree with your statement.

But I don't think that refusing technology is the issue here. It is more about controlling influences and choosing & measuring our forms of entertainment.
 

RegalSin

Banned
Sep 3, 2011
117
0
0
Tv time is family time. All other times is homework, and outdoors fun time.

Videogames ( being a media ) along with comic books, and animations should be considered an alternative to tv time.

Videogames, and videos should be done in the living room area. If they have a handheld that is their own business for you to sneak up on them and catch them in the act. The same with pornography.

Internet access should also be classed as television time. In the same room where a family member is.

In general a young kid don't need television, videogames, or even internet for development.

They need toys, comics, children books,
and learning books to help them. These should be the only other long term thing in conjunction to television time.

In general you want to keep em busy, well keep em busy learning how to play a musical instrument ( even guitar hero, which is not a standard insturment but can be considered one ). or even learn how to draw people, scenary, and shapes.

TV time is practically non-exsistant, and is a cheap way to keep somebody occupied along with internet.

Videogames are more stimulating then any tv time programs. All tv time should be done with parents, in a household standard setting.

No child room should have a television.

The worst thing you could have is a room with somebody on the internet all day long. Even with high grades.

Imagine a seven year old person, and the first thing he looked up was pussy
(a slang used by first graders, along with other words ). You enter pussy and will find other things.

I know all you here, when you first started to use AOL, or Netscape, entered other wonderful words. Then I found out what the wonderful world of BDSM is and how common it is. Thank you under paid cheaply affordable intern-net.


TV is far safer then the internet. They might not learn a damn thing they need to survive in society asides

"When you get a snake bite, don't suck out the poison, or wrap your arm. Just call 911 on your cancerious cell phone and sit their and wait for help"

Thank you future world............

Forget it, television is worst, just make them listen to Howard Stern reruns, on K-rock.
 

VICTORIAVIGILANTI

New member
Aug 14, 2020
2
1
1
In my opinion, there isn't a true valid answer, it all depends on lifestyle and your kids and also the type of screentime! My kids are really getting onto educational apps and learning through play! Instead of watching Peppa Pig, or playing random games, I let them have educational screentime. Our family favourite app right now is Eduka's World! It's an English learning app and they LOVE IT and it's FREE! Here is the link in case you want to try it: https://bit.ly/3l5hB8v
 
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InstaCraft Art

New member
Nov 1, 2020
2
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PLAY & LEARN - These days it's hard to limit screen time. In a recent report by the world economic forum about working from home, "WFH" shows the number of hours spent working and NOT working while doing the at-home office thing we are all getting used to now because of COVID. One of the challenges parents are having relates to childcare whilst working and attending to various work assignments and zoom meeting. While companies are generally trying to be accepting of this "new normal" many working parents are having to find creative ways to have children quietly work or stay engaged in some activity. Necessity is the mother of all inventions as they say and in this case we see parents using more interactive passive play and learn experiences. One simple way to combine a bit of screen time with passive learning is the explore a giant coloring poster of the USA . This is a 3-foot x 2-foot giant poster with a free companion website that allows kids to color and engauge with online national Geographic Kids content. We feel like it's the digital equivalent of hiding veggies in the lazagna, the kids will have fin and QUIETLY spend hors working away leaving you to focus on work. Its not perfect but it works. The newly launched product is lookig for early adopeters for feedback, the Giant Kids Coloring Poster from Colorstarter regularly priced at $15 but currently on sale now for $8.99 and comes with free access to the interactive web component !
 

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Amanda Jane

New member
Nov 6, 2020
10
3
3
In my opinion, there isn't a true valid answer, it all depends on lifestyle and your kids and also the type of screentime! My kids are really getting onto educational apps and learning through play! Instead of watching Peppa Pig, or playing random games, I let them have educational screentime. Our family favourite app right now is Eduka's World! It's an English learning app and they LOVE IT and it's FREE! Here is the link in case you want to try it: https://bit.ly/3l5hB8v
I agree that there isn't a firm answer, in that during this pandemic it's better to encourage proactive type screentime where kids can learn something and engage, rather than passive watching. Obviously, gaming contains interaction and stimulation and is definitely not a good idea if you can steer your child away from it entirely. Once they get bitten by that bug - which seems kind of inevitable these days - it's hard but necessary work to keep tight limits on that. Most importantly, it's vital that enough hours of the day are spent interacting with the real world, family and outdoors. My kids are allowed a few hours of screentime as long as they play outside, engage with us in the home and put all devices away for meals, and of course do all their schoolwork. The time they have online is very often the only social life they can have with their peers, so at this time I wouldn't veto it.
 

Amanda Jane

New member
Nov 6, 2020
10
3
3
I agree that there isn't a firm answer, in that during this pandemic it's better to encourage proactive type screentime where kids can learn something and engage, rather than passive watching. Obviously, gaming contains interaction and stimulation and is definitely not a good idea if you can steer your child away from it entirely. Once they get bitten by that bug - which seems kind of inevitable these days - it's hard but necessary work to keep tight limits on that. Most importantly, it's vital that enough hours of the day are spent interacting with the real world, family and outdoors. My kids are allowed a few hours of screentime as long as they play outside, engage with us in the home and put all devices away for meals, and of course do all their schoolwork. The time they have online is very often the only social life they can have with their peers, so at this time I wouldn't veto it.
I'd add that I'd love to know what other people suggest as their favourite way of limiting screentime, especially for adolescents. Any ideas?
 

graciousparent

New member
Dec 21, 2020
4
2
3
Here are some suggestions on limiting screen time: https://graciousparent.com/2020/06/08/how-much-screen-time-is-too-much/

My favorite approach to determining whether or not children should be using screen time is to ask yourself "what is this taking away from?". If it is taking away from play outdoors, social interaction or independent play I would pass. However, if you need 20mins or so to make dinner or phone call then there's no harm in a short duration of screetime.

Hope you find this helpful :)
 

Amanda Jane

New member
Nov 6, 2020
10
3
3
Here are some suggestions on limiting screen time: https://graciousparent.com/2020/06/08/how-much-screen-time-is-too-much/

My favorite approach to determining whether or not children should be using screen time is to ask yourself "what is this taking away from?". If it is taking away from play outdoors, social interaction or independent play I would pass. However, if you need 20mins or so to make dinner or phone call then there's no harm in a short duration of screetime.

Hope you find this helpful :)
Thanks for the tips. Anything to maintain a healthy balance.👍👍
 

Billok

New member
Feb 23, 2021
4
0
1
I believe that in the early childhood that is necessary to restrict the quantity of screen time